PARISH MAPS - HISTORY EXAMPLE

The Department  has set about preserving old parish maps. This is good news for those concerned with the history of land settlement. The following is a case study of portion 49 parish Catombal showing how the old maps can be used for searching land ownership and crown tenures.

Original Crown grant to Robert Munro 1881



Note the water reserve (WR 11375) which probably, was intended to allow selectors access to water. The squatters would try to deny settlers access to water.


Changed tenure to 1884 CP




The CP is now 84-214 which is the 214th CP granted by the ZOrange Land Board Office in 1884. Robert Munro has taken out a new CP with probably better, terms and conditions. The water reserve has now been revoked and sold as being considered unnecessary.


1908



Robert Munro has borrowed from the Goldsbrough Mort company and paid out the CP, converting to freehold. The property is in the name of the mortgagee because it is old system title. New system title or torrens title was introduced with the Real Property Act 1862. Torrens land when mortgaged, remains in the name of the mortgagor.

Note that once land is alienated from the crown it is coloured grey and the Lands Department has no more interest in it. Land still belonging to the crown such as portion 3 below portion 49 remains pink, denoting crown land.

1917


The property has been acquired (bought) under the Closer Settlement Act and thus becomes crown land again. It has been granted to Charles Bayliss as a Settlement Purchase in 1919.

The name Kupkes farm is interesting as the current name of the farm is Hamalet which is the correct spelling of Hamlet, the Prince of Denmark. Kupke is a north europen name and that may be why it was named Hamalet.

1933



1960s

Charles Bayliss still owns portion 49 but now as a Settlement Purchase Lease 44-1. The area was designated a Settlement Purchase Area in 1919. Note of transfer 66/17 shows that Charles Bayliss sold the property in 1966. The name of the new owner is available from the local Land Board Office.

 To bring the historical record up to date it is necessary to examine the current map at the Land Board Office. This shows that it was sold in 1997 and subsequently converted to freehold.


See

identification rural











































































PARISH MAPS - HISTORY EXAMPLE

The Department  has set about preserving old parish maps. This is good news for those concerned with the history of land settlement. The following is a case study of portion 49 parish Catombal showing how the old maps can be used for searching land ownership and crown tenures.

Original Crown grant to Robert Munro 1881



Note the water reserve (WR 11375) which probably, was intended to allow selectors access to water. The squatters would try to deny settlers access to water.


Changed tenure to 1884 CP




The CP is now 84-214 which is the 214th CP granted by the ZOrange Land Board Office in 1884. Robert Munro has taken out a new CP with probably better, terms and conditions. The water reserve has now been revoked and sold as being considered unnecessary.


1908



Robert Munro has borrowed from the Goldsbrough Mort company and paid out the CP, converting to freehold. The property is in the name of the mortgagee because it is old system title. New system title or torrens title was introduced with the Real Property Act 1862. Torrens land when mortgaged, remains in the name of the mortgagor.

Note that once land is alienated from the crown it is coloured grey and the Lands Department has no more interest in it. Land still belonging to the crown such as portion 3 below portion 49 remains pink, denoting crown land.

1917


The property has been acquired (bought) under the Closer Settlement Act and thus becomes crown land again. It has been granted to Charles Bayliss as a Settlement Purchase in 1919.

The name Kupkes farm is interesting as the current name of the farm is Hamalet which is the correct spelling of Hamlet, the Prince of Denmark. Kupke is a north europen name and that may be why it was named Hamalet.

1933


Charles Bayliss still owns portion 49 but now as a Settlement Purchase Lease 44-1. The area was designated a Settlement Purchase Area in 1919. Note of transfer 66/17 shows that Charles Bayliss sold the property in 1966. The name of the new owner is available from the local Land Board Office.


1970



The parish map as it exists today. It shows that there has been to more transfers in 1973 and 1974. The last recorded owners are FL and FG Stanford. To bring the historical record up to date it is necessary to examine the current map at the Land Board Office. This shows that it was sold in 1997 and subsequently converted to freehold.


See

identification rural

































































































































CONTRACTS AND DEPOSITS

If you want to buy a home, land or investment property you’ll have to sign a sale contract. The legal work involved in preparing the sale contract, mortgage and other related documents, is called conveyancing. It’s possible to do your own conveyancing, however, most people get a licensed conveyancer or solicitor to do the work for them.

The sale contract

By law, a residential property can not be put on the market until a sale contract has been been drawn up. You have the right to examine the contract at any time once a property is on the market. If a particular property interests you, get a copy of the sale contract as soon as possible so you can ask your solicitor or conveyancer to review it. You should have this done before signing a sale contract.

Exchanging contracts and paying a deposit

Exchanging sale contracts is the legal part of buying a home. Before exchange, the agreement is usually just verbal and not binding. Up until you exchange contracts either you or the vendor have the right to change your minds.

After you have discussed the contract with your solicitor or licensed conveyancer and all the proper inquiries have been made, and after all the financial arrangements are in place, you will be ready to exchange contracts. There will be two copies of the sale contract: one for you and one for the vendor. You each sign one copy before they are swapped or






















































CONTRACTS AND DEPOSITS

If you want to buy a home, land or investment property you’ll have to sign a sale contract. The legal work involved in preparing the sale contract, mortgage and other related documents, is called conveyancing. It’s possible to do your own conveyancing, however, most people get a licensed conveyancer or solicitor to do the work for them.

The sale contract

By law, a residential property can not be put on the market until a sale contract has been been drawn up. You have the right to examine the contract at any time once a property is on the market. If a particular property interests you, get a copy of the sale contract as soon as possible so you can ask your solicitor or conveyancer to review it. You should have this done before signing a sale contract.

Exchanging contracts and paying a deposit

Exchanging sale contracts is the legal part of buying a home. Before exchange, the agreement is usually just verbal and not binding. Up until you exchange contracts either you or the vendor have the right to change your minds.

After you have discussed the contract with your solicitor or licensed conveyancer and all the proper inquiries have been made, and after all the financial arrangements are in place, you will be ready to exchange contracts. There will be two copies of the sale contract: one for you and one for the vendor. You each sign one copy before they are swapped or